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Domestic violence

According to a 2017 survey by the World Health Organization (WHO), the risk of developing post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after experiencing psychological trauma is equal to 4%. This risk is multiplied by 3 and reaches almost 12% when trauma is associated with sexual or partner violence.

Similarly, when we look specifically at women who have been victims of domestic violence, and compare them with those who have not experienced any such violence, we see that they have a 7-fold increased risk of suffering from PTSD.

PDF - Signs of PTSD in victims of domestic violence

Domestic violence

You're wondering about your relationship, past or present, and its impact on your well-being and mental health. We still often think that domestic violence only affects a minority of couples, that it only affects disadvantaged social groups, and that it only consists of physical violence. Yet more than 1 in 4 women and 1 in 5 men claim to have been subjected to psychological violence within the couple at least once since the age of 15. 1 in 6 women claim to have been the victim of physical and/or sexual violence by an intimate partner at least once since the age of 15, compared with 1 in 18 men, according to the Genèse survey (SSMI, 2022).

PDF - Understanding domestic violencePDF - Surrounding yourself: where to find help?

Child and adolescent victims

Some children and teenagers experience domestic violence on a daily basis. They are exposed to scenes of violence and are affected by the coercive control exercised continuously at home. They are not simply witnesses to the violence, but victims who co-experience the aggression suffered by the victimized parent. They experience the same fear, terror, hypervigilance and insecurity. That's why we speak of domestic violence when children live in the home affected by conjugal violence. What's more, the physical and mental health consequences for children and adolescents are significant, as they can suffer from traumatic developmental disorders. The sooner a child is in a safe environment, the faster his or her recovery.

PDF - Figures and resources on domestic violencePDF - Understanding developmental trauma disorder in children
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What does the law say?

Children are now considered by law to be victims in their own right. The World Health Organization defines domestic violence as a possible form of violence against children. Domestic violence is particularly prevalent in households with the youngest children. Violence increases during pregnancy and in the months following childbirth.

[/vc_row_inner]Decree of November 23, 2021

The Feminicide Protocol

Since 2022, a system for the immediate care of children has been gradually rolled out across France in the event of the murder of one spouse by another. The public prosecutor issues a provisional placement order for the child, lasting a maximum of 8 days. The child is then taken into care at a local hospital, designated in the protocol. It is recommended that the child be hospitalized for at least 72 hours in a pediatric ward, in liaison with the child psychiatry department, in order to assess his or her physical and mental health. At the same time, the child welfare service assesses the child's situation and suggests a home best suited to his or her needs. The aim of this protocol, which has already been tested in Seine-Saint-Denis since 2016, is to protect and support child victims by securing their path from the outset. It also makes it possible to coordinate the intervention of all the professionals involved (law enforcement, justice, healthcare and child protection). This care is systematically provided for all children who witness the crime, and is recommended even for those who were not present at the scene.

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Cultural resources

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Discover all the cultural recommendations on the theme of "Domestic violence".

Cultural resources
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